Taking advantage

I’m a cheeky mare it has to be said. I take advantage of situations whenever I can.

To summarise my cheekiness in taking advantage of every situation:

  • I took advantage of a meeting in London finishing early to shoot across town to the Goldhawk Road for my first ever visit.
  • I took advantage of an amazing sale rack to buy 3 metres of lovely soft fabric for £10.
  • I took advantage of the husband being on backshift to spend the evening drinking wine and cutting out the pieces for this dress.
  • I took advantage of the small child being ill and needing an extra long afternoon nap to do some sewing.

All in all my cheekiness resulted in a new shirt dress in a day for me! So on this situation I think being a cheeky mare and taking advantage of situations paid off in my favour. RESULT!

Also don’t judge me on taking advantage of the sick child. After her being a velcro child all morning and projectile vomiting on me I think we both needed a break.

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This is pattern is McCalls M6696. I’ve made a couple of shirt dresses from it already but messed the collar up on both of them. After my debacle adventure in learning to sew a man’s shirt (no thanks to Burda) I had the confidence to try again. I was also a cocky so and so and decided to funk it up and go a teeny bit off piste. Hence I used the collar stand but not the collar.

Gives it a bit of an oriental feel me thinks?

I’m not a fan of the poofyness at the back – I think I’ll scale down the gathered bits next time. Makes me look a bit hunchbacked.

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I don’t know why I look so happy here – have you ever seen legs as white as that in June? Summer has almost entirely failed to arrive in Scotland this year. Two years ago I spent 3 weeks in my back garden sunbathing waiting for my baby to arrive. I was nutbrown and fabulous. This year I’ve seen about 2 minutes of sun since I was in Uganda in January.

 

Come on Summer!!

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21 thoughts on “Taking advantage

  1. what a lively blog!! Love your shirtdress, I was like you when my children were small, I had four!! Now i am a Grandma and I can sew to my hearts content! Thank you for the lovely comment on my blog too 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I just went to Goldhawk Road after a meeting too. I don’t think that it is cheeky, just a good use of resource. Love your dress. I really like the fabric and that pattern, although a lot of people have commented about the amount of excess fabric in the back. Nothing wrong with a milk bottle tan. I have one too, in daylight I look blue. Must be a Scottish thing. 🙂 xx

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I know what you are talking about, I’m mother of two ladies now and the lack of time makes that when you have 5 minutes you take advantage of them . Love this pattern and the fabric is nice too. It suits you. Well done!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I read an excellent article recently about why employers should employ mothers. It was all to do with the amazing efficiency of them – the ability to squeeze an hours work into 10 minutes. I can certainly subscribe to that!

      Like

  4. I just bought this pattern a couple of weeks ago! I found a printed linen around the same time, only 2 yards left on the bolt, but it’s 58″ wide, so I’m thinking of making the sleeveless, straight-skirt version. I don’t think I’ve worn a shirt dress in my life, so I’m really excited! Your dress is gorgeous!!

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Great advice, thanks, Lesley! I’ve been through the not-enough-buttons dilemma in the past, and depending on the project, it sometimes works to sew in small snaps where a button would normally go. I also have been known to use unmatching buttons, which can be fun if you find a “theme” that works. One of my favorite examples is a sweater I knitted, and couldn’t find enough matching buttons in the large diameter required, so I found 5 different buttons, all the same size, all black, and all some sort of flower. I love that sweater. : )

        Liked by 1 person

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